The Lord’s Prayer in Old English

Old English” is version of English spoken from approximately AD 450 to about 1100, and was in use in much of England and southeast Scotland. It also known as “Anglo-Saxon”, and is a combination of the Germanic based languages of Old Norse and Old Frisian, and Latin.

Fæder ure

Fæder ure þu þe eart on heofonum;

Si þin nama gehalgod

to becume þin rice

gewurþe ðin willa

on eorðan swa swa on heofonum.

urne gedæghwamlican hlaf syle us todæg

and forgyf us ure gyltas

swa swa we forgyfað urum gyltendum

and ne gelæd þu us on costnunge

ac alys us of yfele soþlice

*

*

Translation of Old English Text

Father our thou that art in heavens

be thy name hallowed

come thy kingdom

be-done thy will

on earth as in heavens

our daily bread give us today

and forgive us our sins

as we forgive those-who-have-sinned-against-us

and not lead thou us into temptation

but deliver us from evil. truly

One thought on “The Lord’s Prayer in Old English

  1. “It also known as “Anglo-Saxon”, and is a combination of the Germanic based languages of Old Norse and Old Frisian, and Latin.”

    Although Old Norse and Old Frisian certainly do have major influence in the Old English and Modern English languages, the clue is in the name, Anglo-Saxon, so you’ve missed out Old Saxon and the language of the Angles. Also, due to the position of the words in your sentence, you’ve accidentally referred to Latin as a Germanic language, which it is not.

    Sorry to be such a picker! I’m sure you don’t actually care :/

    Grijnwaald.

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